Mini Sport front brake assembly, fitted to bogus 2

When it comes to enhancing your Mini's performance, your Mini's Brakes are a crucial aspect that demands attention. Most upgrades focus on the front end, ensuring your Mini can handle the demands of modern driving while maintaining its classic charm. Let's dive into the details of our recent brake enhancements, ensuring every component is optimised for safety and performance.

Rear Brakes and Handbrake Quadrants

We started by replacing the rear brake backplates with Mini Sport pre-built replacement rear brakes. These units come with Mini Sport alloy Minifin replica brake drums, which significantly improve brake shoe cooling and match the Cooper S/Rover rear drum offset.

To ensure the longevity and smooth operation of the handbrake quadrants, we used 3-in-One White Lithium aerosol grease. This product not only protects the quadrants but also keeps the handbrake cable well-lubricated.

Front drive flange being bolted onto new mini sport brake disc rotor using cap head bolts

Caliper and Hose Installation

Using Aluminium Calipers

When using aluminium calipers, it's important to include both a flat washer and a spring washer when bolting it to the hub. This spreads the load effectively. In contrast, the standard cast iron calipers (like the heavy AP items) do not require an extra flat washer. We utilised Mini Sport's alloy four-pot calipers for superior braking power.

Connecting Steel Braided Hoses

Goodridge steel braided hoses were chosen to connect the calipers to the front subframe. These hoses require a copper washer, which should be replaced if the hose needs to be undone. This ensures a reliable and leak-free connection. 

A flat and spring washer bolting the brake caliper.
Steel hoses connecting brake calipers to the front subframe

Securing Hoses to the Subframe

The inboard end of the Goodridge caliper hoses is secured with a plain nut and a special anti-shake washer, locking it to the front subframe. This type of aggressive lock washer is essential here. To avoid twisting stresses, always fit the hoses to the calipers first, then to the subframe.

Inboard ends of caliper hose bolted to the subframe

Vented and Grooved Rotors

The Mini Sport vented and grooved rotors can be mounted in either direction. When the grooves point with rotation, more air is pulled into the pad, enhancing cooling but increasing noise. If the grooves point the other way, brake noise is reduced, but cooling is less effective in motorsport conditions.

By following these detailed steps, you can ensure your Mini's braking system is both reliable and effective, ready to meet the demands of any driving scenario. Remember this is just a guide, if you are unsure about any steps involved in this process contact a trusted professional. The Mini Sport team can be contacted for advice, recommend nations or to book an appointment. Get in touch today!

Full Brake assembly, with mini sport vented and grooved rotors

Want to read Keeping Your Mini Alive 6th Edition Magazine? Download the PDF here

Front Cover of the Keeping Your Mini Alive Magazine

Don't miss out on the rest of the Bogus 2 Series!

This blog series is your go to for a guide to taking your Mini from a bare shell to a road-worthy classic. Check out the rest of the series for tips and advice from our Mini Experts for every stage of your Mini restoration!

Throughout the restoration process, using high-quality products ensures durability and performance. Visit our website to find all the parts mentioned in this guide.

If you need any help or expert advice, don't hesitate to contact us. Happy restoring!

Stay Connected with Mini Sport:

Follow us on social media for the latest news, restoration tips, project updates, and to see more classic Minis brought back to life!

This guide is meant to provide general information and a step-by-step approach to restoring your Mini's front subframe and suspension. It is always recommended to contact a trusted professional if you are unsure about any part of the process or lack the necessary tools and experience. Safety should be your top priority.

When it comes to enhancing your Mini's performance, your Mini's Brakes are a crucial aspect that demands attention. Most upgrades focus on the front end, ensuring your Mini can handle the demands of modern driving while maintaining its classic charm. Let's dive into the details of our recent brake enhancements, ensuring every component is optimised [...]
Subframe being lifted into the shell, ready for the suspension.

Heavier Duty but Not Difficult: Upgrading Your Mini's Front End

Upgrading the front suspension of your classic Mini can seem daunting, but with the right parts and a meticulous approach, it's a straightforward process. At Mini Sport Ltd., we specialise in providing top-quality components and expert guidance to help you enhance your Mini's performance.

Standard Rubber Doughnuts (Cones) and Top Arms

We started by fitting standard rubber doughnuts (cones) with the original top arms, refurbished with new pivot shaft kits. For adjustable ride height, we used Mini Sport’s Adjusta-Ride suspension trumpets, renowned for their quality.

To reduce twist and increase the stiffness of the front subframe, we added fillets and seam welds along the suspension towers. This, along with solid mounts for Mk4-on front subframes, helps with finer steering and handling but may also increase noise, vibration, and harshness.

Standard rubber donuts with original top suspension arms
An Additional fillet on a front mini subframe

Installing the Adjusta-Ride Kit

Mini Sport’s Adjusta-Ride kit, equipped with a grease nipple to prevent thread seizing, was installed. It also comes with a cover over the thread to prevent water damage. During a trial fit, we found the thread on the urethane bump stop was too long and shortened it by 10mm for easier future removal.

Mini Sport exclusive Adjusta Ride Suspension System for classic Mini
Shortening thread on a Mini Suspension Bump Stop by 10mm

Pre-Assembling on the Bench

As with the rear subframe, pre-assembling components on the bench simplifies the process. We used copper grease on various parts, such as the bump stop and its locknut, to prevent seizing and ensure easy removal in the future. This step is crucial, especially in water-prone areas.

For help or advice on building your Mini's subframe, contact us today, or visit our Easy Parts Finder to identify the parts you need.

Building the front subframe before fitment of the suspension to the mini.
Shortening thread on a Mini Suspension Bump Stop by 10mm

Securing the Pivot Shaft

Use new bolts to retain the pivot shaft. Clean the threads for the captive nuts on both sides of the subframe with a UNF tap before fitting the plate.

Fitting the Dust Cover

Pull the dust cover on the forward part of the top arm back over the outer edge of the casting before fitting the top arm. This aids the fitting process. Once the pivot is in place, push the dust cover back into its correct position.

Fit the polyurethane rebound buffer, or droop-stop, while the spring is still compressed. Use a washer to spread the mounting screw load on this all-plastic type, as self-tappers usually ruin the captive nuts.

New bolts have been used to maintain the pivot shaft
Dust cover pulled back before the top arm is fitted
Fitting the polyurethane rebound buffer while spring is compressed.

Compressing the Rubber Doughnut (Cone)

Using a Mini Sport suspension compressor, we compressed a standard rubber doughnut to easily install the top arm. Later rubber doughnuts tend to have a metric internal thread, so ensure compatibility with your compressor tool.

Suspension compresser used to compress the standard rubber donut cone
Inserting upper arm pivot shaft to the top suspension arm

Adjusting the Tie Bars

For this build, we selected Mini Sport’s fully adjustable Group A race-proven tie bars. The original standard tie-bar was used to gauge the required length of the adjustable one. Copper grease was applied to all relevant parts to improve longevity and ease future adjustments. Note that tie-bar adjustment primarily affects the caster angle but also impacts the toe angle.

Solid subframe mounts to sharpen steering and handling
Mini Sport adjustable group a tie rods.

Setting Up the Bottom Arms

Mini Sport’s adjustable bottom arms, tested on rally cars for durability, were installed. Using the standard bottom arms as a reference, we ensured the correct setup length to allow for front wheel camber changes. These arms, with their large Rose joints and built-in dust guards, offer both reliability and adjustability.

Cooper grease used to avoid seizing in the tie-bar
Coonecting tie-rod and bottom arm for the minis suspension system
Bolting in tie-bar mount , so that it is accessible

Final Assembly and Installation

With the fully adjustable front suspension sorted, we lifted the subframe into the bodyshell. This can be done solo with trolley jacks, but having a strong helper is ideal. Once the subframe is in place, all bolts were torqued up correctly.

Subframe being lifted into the shell, ready for the suspension.
Fitting tower bolts to connect subframe to the bodyshell

A towing eye was fitted, essential for any track or motorsport car. We also used a genuine subframe bolt strap with water seals, eliminating the need for an additional person inside the car.

Towing eye is fitted, an essential for a motorsport car.
Genuine subframe bolt strap, to secure the rear mounting bolts

Mini Sport’s front top damper mount, designed for rally-style abuse, was installed. This robust component features a removable bolt and a boxed bracket for added strength, ensuring long-lasting performance under demanding conditions

Copper grease is used to the damper top mount so it can easilt be removed.
Large washers fitted to either side of the front damper bottom mounting eye
Bottom damper mount being done up,

Want to read Keeping Your Mini Alive 6th Edition Magazine? Download the PDF here

Front Cover of the Keeping Your Mini Alive Magazine

Don't miss out on the rest of the Bogus 2 Series!

This blog series is your go to for a guide to taking your Mini from a bare shell to a road-worthy classic. Check out the rest of the series for tips and advice from our Mini Experts for every stage of your Mini restoration!

Throughout the restoration process, using high-quality products ensures durability and performance. Visit our website to find all the parts mentioned in this guide.

If you need any help or expert advice, don't hesitate to contact us. Happy restoring!

Stay Connected with Mini Sport:

Follow us on social media for the latest news, restoration tips, project updates, and to see more classic Minis brought back to life!

This guide is meant to provide general information and a step-by-step approach to restoring your Mini's front subframe and suspension. It is always recommended to contact a trusted professional if you are unsure about any part of the process or lack the necessary tools and experience. Safety should be your top priority.

Heavier Duty but Not Difficult: Upgrading Your Mini's Front End Upgrading the front suspension of your classic Mini can seem daunting, but with the right parts and a meticulous approach, it's a straightforward process. At Mini Sport Ltd., we specialise in providing top-quality components and expert guidance to help you enhance your Mini's performance. Standard [...]

Steering Rack: Get It Right the First Time

Changing a steering rack can be a real hassle later on, so it's crucial to get it right the first time. Follow our detailed steps to ensure a smooth and efficient installation process for your Mini.

Standard length trackrod ends to be fitted to be fitted with a new steering column

Check and Replace Trackrod Gaiter

During our careful inspection of the steering rack, we discovered a tiny split in the trackrod gaiter. Though the split was small, the boot was full of water. To prevent future issues, we replaced the boots and re-lubricated the rack.

Split in trackrod gaiter, to be replaced due to water leaks.
Track rod ends greased ready for fitment on the steering system.

Inspect Trackrod Ends

We examined the trackrods for pitting and wear in the ball joints. Surprisingly, despite the water intrusion, there were no problems. While manuals typically specify that the rack should be oil-filled, we found that packing it well with LM grease is a more practical alternative. It’s less messy and less prone to draining away.

Standard-length trackrod ends were fitted next. By counting the number of turns while removing the original rod ends, we ensured that the tracking would be approximately correct. Precision tracking should be verified later using specialised equipment.

Upgrade your Mini's performance with our high-quality track rod ends. Shop Track Rod Ends Now!

Standard length trackrod ends to be fitted to be fitted with a new steering column

Fit Foam Washer for Noise and Leak Reduction

Before bolting the steering column in place, remember to fit the foam washer over the steering column's splined shaft. This helps seal a large hole in the bulkhead, reducing noise and preventing water leaks.

New Nyloc nuts and washers were fitted to the rack’s U-clamps. At this stage, the nuts are not fully tightened since the column still needs to be adjusted. Once the steering column is fitted, adjust it to the correct angle before tightening the U-bolts. Ensure the rack’s splined shaft aligns perfectly with the steering column inner shaft to avoid dangerous stresses.

Not sure what parts you need? Use our easy parts finder to get the right components for your Mini. Find Your Parts Today!

Foam washer fitted over the steering column splined shaft

Final Positioning and Vibration Reduction

Here’s the rack fitted and held in place with its special U-clamps. Note the anti-vibration plastic strip, a feature of later Minis. This simple strip reduces resonance in the rack and helps prevent the bolts from working loose. This end of the rack defines its position relative to the bodyshell and must be fitted before the front subframe, although final angle adjustments can be made later.

Proper installation of your Mini's steering rack is essential for a smooth and safe driving experience. By following these detailed steps, you can ensure your Mini performs at its best. For any assistance or to have a professionally fitted Steering Rack, don't hesitate to contact the Mini Sport Team.

Nyloc nuts fitted onto steering rack U Clamps
Steering rack fitted with Special U Clamps onto Mini.

Want to read Keeping Your Mini Alive 6th Edition Magazine? Download the PDF here

Front Cover of the Keeping Your Mini Alive Magazine

Don't miss out on the rest of the Bogus 2 Series!

This blog series is your go to for a guide to taking your Mini from a bare shell to a road-worthy classic. Check out the rest of the series for tips and advice from our Mini Experts for every stage of your Mini restoration!

Your classic Mini is more than just a car, it's a symbol of classic style and a joy to drive. But wouldn't you love a touch more confidence and control behind the wheel? At Mini Sport Ltd., our specialise in helping you enhance your Mini's driving experience.

Contact us today  let's reimagine your Mini's handling together!

Stay Connected with Mini Sport:

Follow us on social media for the latest news, restoration tips, project updates, and to see more classic Minis brought back to life!

Steering Rack: Get It Right the First Time Changing a steering rack can be a real hassle later on, so it's crucial to get it right the first time. Follow our detailed steps to ensure a smooth and efficient installation process for your Mini. Check and Replace Trackrod Gaiter During our careful inspection of the [...]

Rear End: Assembling the Lighter Mini Subframe

The iconic Bogus 2 rebuild project continues at Mini Sport Ltd.! In our previous guide, we delved into the steering rack. Now, let's shift gears and focus on bringing the rear suspension of this classic Mini back to life.

Assembling the rear subframe on a bench not only simplifies the process but also reduces the risk of damaging the shell. Here’s a step-by-step guide to ensure a smooth assembly.

Fitting a rear mini subframe as part of the rear suspension system.

Initial Assembly and Preparation

Assembling the rear subframe on a bench makes life easier and reduces the chance of damaging the shell. Initially, only the trunnions are fitted, as the heavy rear radius arms make subframe installation more difficult.

The mounting points for the rear trunnions were covered during powder coating, so they needed cleaning before fitting the trunnions. The threads were also checked and cleaned with a wire brush, nut, or dye if necessary.

Assembling rear subframe and suspension system on bench
Cleaning Rear Trunnion mounting points on the rear subframe

Fitting the Trunnion Kit

An ultra-light alloy DSN Classics trunnion kit was fitted, shown here with replacement steel trunnion pins and Mini Sport poly bushes. The trunnion pins are standard Mini items. Apply some copper grease on the shaft and thread to prevent the trunnion from seizing. The trunnions are fitted with a Nyloc nut, but not finally tightened until the subframe is in place at all four corners.

Ultra Light allor DSN classics trunnion kit to be fitted onto a classic mini
Trunnions fitted with Nyloc nut and cooper grease to prevent seizing on a rear subframe

Installing the Rear Subframe

Forward Pin Adjustment

The nut on the forward pin is not fully tightened before the subframe is bolted into the shell. Since nobody seems to make the two-pronged tool needed to lock off the trunnion pin, improvisation is required.

With all the trunnions fitted and positioned in the direction of their mounting points, the rear subframe is ready to be fitted. The front trunnion mountings need to be cleared after the shell has been painted. It’s critical to get some copper grease into these captive nuts, as this is a rust-prone area of the shell.

Nut being loosely fitted onto the rear mini subframe
Copper grease applied to captive nuts as it is a rust prone area

The heelboard in the British Motor Heritage-supplied floor pan needed modifying during trial fitting. Access to the captive nut wasn't possible without elongating the hole before painting. A Dremel is useful for this job, but protect the thread carefully.

Lifting and Aligning the Subframe

Lifting the subframe is at least a two-person job due to the nuts and bolts alignment required. Get at least one bolt in each trunnion first before attempting the second to avoid scratching the paint. Take care when inserting the mounting bolts into the heelboard captive nuts. Support the subframe to relieve the load off the bolt. These points are crucial for suspension geometry, especially for older captive nuts that are difficult to replace if stripped

Fitting a rear mini subframe as part of the rear suspension system.
Modified mounting points in the BMH heelboard

Fitting Radius Arms and Damper

With the rear subframe in place, tighten the front and rear trunnion Nyloc nuts before fitting the radius arms. Before installing the radius arms, fit the new knuckle joint into each arm on the bench. Ensure the knuckle joints are properly packed with grease, using a new nylon cup.

Rear Trunnion Nyloc Nuts tightened before radius arms fitment on rear subframe
New Knuckle joints fitted into each radius arms

Adjustable Rear Camber/Tracking Brackets

The Mini Sport adjustable rear camber/tracking brackets had to be modified to fit the DSN leading trunnion. This modification is due to the more bulbous outer radius of the trunnion compared to standard camber brackets. Tighten the adjustable rear camber/tracking bracket. Fine adjustments will be done once the car is back on the floor and fitted with its correct wheels.

Modified Mini Sport adjustable rear camber brackets, on Rear Subframe
Tightened adjustable camber/tracking bracket

Using Copper Grease

Apply copper grease to the inside surface of the connecting rod between the rear cone and knuckle joint. This ensures the cone remains removable in the future. Apply copper grease to the outer shaft at the cone end. When positioning the offside Adjusta Ride cone, ensure the grease nipple is accessible to avoid difficulties posed by the battery box.

Cooper Grease on mini sport adjusta ride system

Fitting Spax Dampers

When fitting the rear Spax dampers, they were found to foul the edge of the radius arm. Trim the upper edge of the arm to clear the damper. Mini Sport prefers not to use the steel cup washer at the top of the rear damper mount rubber bush, as it causes chatter. Let the bush sit against the wheel arch surface to minimise noise.

Spax Mini Shock Absorbers for classic Mini Suspension

Ensuring Clearance

Ensure the damper top thread clears the fuel tank when the Mini is on its wheels. Trial fit a standard tank to verify. Finally, fit the Mini Sport dry-suspension-specific handbrake quadrants. Remember to secure the quadrant shaft with the tiny split pin and washer.

Rear suspension damper with a bush touching the wheel arch
Mini Sport handbrake quadrant fitted with adjusta ride suspension system

Want to read Keeping Your Mini Alive 6th Edition Magazine? Download the PDF here

Front Cover of the Keeping Your Mini Alive Magazine

Don't miss out on the rest of the Bogus 2 Series!

This blog series is your go to for a guide to taking your Mini from a bare shell to a road-worthy classic. Check out the rest of the series for tips and advice from our Mini Experts for every stage of your Mini restoration!

Need help or advice on upgrading your Mini's rear suspension? Contact us today for expert guidance tailored to enhance your driving experience. Let's restore your Mini together!

Stay Connected with Mini Sport:

Follow us on social media for the latest news, restoration tips, project updates, and to see more classic Minis brought back to life!

Rear End: Assembling the Lighter Mini Subframe The iconic Bogus 2 rebuild project continues at Mini Sport Ltd.! In our previous guide, we delved into the steering rack. Now, let's shift gears and focus on bringing the rear suspension of this classic Mini back to life. Assembling the rear subframe on a bench not only [...]

The Stripdown: Which Suspension and Brake Bits Can Be Reused?

Our meticulous approach ensures that every component is thoroughly inspected and restored to its peak performance. We started with a complete Rover Mini standard front subframe set-up, removed from the donor vehicle of our project, Bogus 2 however a thorough check, the subframe was found to be in excellent condition, making it suitable for reuse. This particular subframe is characteristic of a later Rover model.

The standard steering rack also passed our stringent quality checks however it required detailed cleaning, afterwards it was deemed fit for reuse. In need of replacement parts? Check out our full range of mini suspension parts >

Original Mini Subframe with the stripped components

Suspension and Steering Components

Upon closer inspection, the outer CV joints showed significant wear and tear, necessitating their replacement. One of the top arms, shown in the image with an alloy suspension cone still fitted, was in a salvageable state. After a detailed clean-up, it was treated with a refurbishing kit that included new bearings. 

While the lower track control arm (bottom arm) and tie-rod were serviceable, they were not reused to ensure optimal performance and safety. The rubber suspension doughnuts appeared ‘squashed’ and were ready for replacement. For more details see Page 27 in the downloadable magazine! 

Not sure what parts you need? Use our Easy Parts Finder to identify or contact our team of Mini Experts for advice.

Front Mini Swivel hubs that can be reused and replaced
Mini Suspension parts including outer CV Joints that will be replaced due to wear

Reusing Front Hubs

The front hubs were another component marked for reuse. After a thorough cleaning, new bearings and ball joints were installed to restore them to their original functionality. The disc guard, however, was deemed unnecessary for this restoration.

Rear Suspension Set-Up

For the rear suspension, the hubs and radius arms were found to be in good condition and were reused. The radius arms underwent an in-house refurbishment process by our skilled technicians. We opted for new Timken-type taper-roller rear wheel bearings for improved reliability.

Unfortunately, the rear subframe was too rusty and needed to be replaced. We stock a range of Mini Suspenesion Parts and Subframes for classic Mini. Discover Now>

Rear suspension set up that will be refurbished and reused.

Subframe Welding: Enhancing Strength, Stiffness, and Handling

Front Subframe Modifications

After shotblasting, all seams on the front subframe were welded to enhance its durability, as this part of the vehicle endures the most stress. We welded two extra plates into the rear of the subframe, where it connects to the rear mounts, for additional support. Additionally, we offer the option to weld two tabs into the section that runs along the bulkhead. These tabs can then be bolted through to the bulkhead, providing extra reinforcement

Unsure about any steps? Contact our team at Mini Sport Ltd for expert guidance or order a built subframe, ready for fitment.

Extra fillets fitted onto front subframe.

Tie Bar Mount Reinforcement

When the subframe was turned over, extra fillets were visible, especially around the front tie bar mounts. Some prefer welding a fillet on the inner side to allow easier access to the tie bar, but our method ensures the mount is more effectively reinforced, resulting in a tougher front subframe.

Rear Subframe Modifications

The new rear subframe also underwent shotblasting prior to welding. Although it required less extensive welding compared to the front subframe, shorter 2-inch weld runs were used along the long edges to stiffen the frame. Need professional welding? Our BodyShop team can handle it for you. Get in touch for a quote today!

Extra fillets fitted onto front subframe.

Final Coating

Once all modifications were complete, both subframes were powder-coated. This final step should only be performed after all welding is finished, as drilling into the coating can compromise its integrity and lead to accelerated corrosion. Some enthusiasts prefer using etch primer and paint as an alternative to powder coating.

Mini subframe after being shotblasted
Powder coating on the Mini Subframe to protect from corrosion

Want to read Keeping Your Mini Alive 6th Edition Magazine? Download the PDF here

Front Cover of the Keeping Your Mini Alive Magazine

Don't miss out on the rest of the Bogus 2 Series!

This blog series is your go to for a guide to taking your Mini from a bare shell to a road-worthy classic. Check out the rest of the series for tips and advice from our Mini Experts for every stage of your Mini restoration!

Your classic Mini is more than just a car, it's a symbol of classic style and a joy to drive. But wouldn't you love a touch more confidence and control behind the wheel? At Mini Sport Ltd., our specialise in helping you enhance your Mini's driving experience.

Contact us today  let's reimagine your Mini's handling together!

Stay Connected with Mini Sport:

Follow us on social media for the latest news, restoration tips, project updates, and to see more classic Minis brought back to life!

The Stripdown: Which Suspension and Brake Bits Can Be Reused? Our meticulous approach ensures that every component is thoroughly inspected and restored to its peak performance. We started with a complete Rover Mini standard front subframe set-up, removed from the donor vehicle of our project, Bogus 2 however a thorough check, the subframe was found [...]
The Mini shell for the Bogus 2 rebuild project being lifted and transported for further assembly.

Keeping your Mini alive is all about smart upgrades and repairs. In this post, we dive into Mini Sport Ltd's process for replacing a rusty door and explore weight-saving modifications for a more performance-focused Mini.

From Rust to Revival: Replacing a Door Shell

Our donor Mini's passenger door was beyond saving, riddled with rust. Thankfully, the driver's side door frame, while showing surface rust, had potential. Here's how Mini Sport Ltd brought it back to life

1. Stripping Down to Bare Metal:

The process began with removing all paint and rust using a combination of stripping and shotblasting. Afterward, the frame received an etch primer to prepare for the next step.

2. Seaming Up for a New Skin:

After drying, the seams were coated with a bonding agent and smoothed to create a seamless base for the new door skin. Replacing a door skin requires precision, as achieving the correct shape is crucial. Originally, Minis were built with doors stretched to fit the frame using hydraulic rams. Here, the opposite approach is taken.

Mini door with seams treated with a bonding agent and smoothed out, ready for a new skin.

3. Weight Reduction with Lexan Windows:

Since we're using lightweight Lexan windows, the heavy standard window winder mechanism and glass could be removed. This saves significant weight, but Lexan is not as strong as glass. To maintain structural integrity, the inner panel (except for the beveled edge) is kept. Removing this small edge makes a big difference in the door's overall strength. Carbon fiber door panels and different door releases will be added later.

Inner panel of a Mini door with the window winder mechanism removed to save weight.

Painting and Additional Touches

Lightweight Champions: Doors & Boot lid

The lightweight steel doors and carbon fiber bootlid received a two-pack paint job and were left to cure in a warm booth. While carbon fiber offers flexibility, the paint's elasticity allows for proper adhesion. Some paints require additional plasticisers for flexible panels.

A freshly painted Mini bonnet with a high-quality finish, ready for installation.

Matching the Shell: Consistent Paint Across Components

The bonnet, a Mini Sport fibreglass item, received pre-drilled slots for quick-release catches during a trial fit before painting. Notably, the same paint batch used on the car's shell was applied to the bonnet, boot lid, and doors, ensuring a perfect colour match. This consistency was achieved by painting everything in a controlled environment within the booth.

A freshly painted Mini door and boot lid with a smooth, glossy finish, completed by Mini Sport Ltd.
Gusset plate welded into the corner of a Mini shell, reinforcing the joint for added strength.

Drilling and Paint Touch-Ups: 

Unfortunately, adding components like corner gussets often requires drilling new holes in the shell. Here, Mini Sport Ltd emphasizes the importance of touch-up paint to preserve the integrity of the overall painted surface.

Wheel Arch Extensions: Selecting the Right Fit 

The final touch? Wheel arch extensions! These are chosen based on your chosen wheels and tires. Mini Sport Ltd opted for Mini Sport Monte Carlo arches, which mount from the inner lip, avoiding drilling into the car's body. This allows for easy removal if needed. Remember, ensure your car's ride height prevents tyre rub against the arches.

Mini with wider wheel arch extensions installed, providing clearance for larger wheels and tires.

By following these steps and considering our expert advice, you can breathe new life into your Mini's doors and achieve a weight-efficient upgrade!

Want to read Keeping Your Mini Alive 6th Edition Magazine? Download the PDF here

Front Cover of the Keeping Your Mini Alive Magazine

Don't miss out on the rest of the Bogus 2 Series!

This blog series is your one-stop shop for following Bogus 2's incredible journey from a bare shell to a road-worthy classic. Check out the rest of the series for tips and advice for every stage of your Mini restoration!

Don't settle for an ordinary Mini. At Mini Sport Ltd., our passion for motorsport fuels our expertise in building winning machines. We offer the knowledge, parts, and guidance you need to optimise your Mini for performance.

Contact us today and let's turn your vision of a motorsport champion into reality..

Stay Connected with Mini Sport:

Follow us on social media for the latest news, restoration tips, project updates, and to see more classic Minis brought back to life!

Keeping your Mini alive is all about smart upgrades and repairs. In this post, we dive into Mini Sport Ltd's process for replacing a rusty door and explore weight-saving modifications for a more performance-focused Mini. From Rust to Revival: Replacing a Door Shell Our donor Mini's passenger door was beyond saving, riddled with rust. Thankfully, [...]
Roll Cage fitted into the fast road Mini 'Bogus 2' by Mini Sport

Equipping your classic Mini for motorsport requires prioritising both performance and safety. In this post, we delve into Mini Sport Ltd.'s process for installing a bolt-in roll cage on the Bogus 2 rebuild project.

Balancing Safety and Convenience: Bolt-In vs. Weld-In Cages

The Bogus 2 features a minimum-spec FIA/RACMSA Safety Devices 7-point bolt-in cage. This choice offers several advantages:

  • Lighter Weight: Compared to welded cages, the bolt-in design saves weight, crucial for performance gains.
  • Easier Painting and Repairs: Bolt-in cages are removable, simplifying the painting process and future repairs.

Pre-Paint Preparations: Ensuring a Perfect Fit

A crucial step before painting involves a trial fit of the cage. This allows for any necessary modifications to both the shell and the cage itself. Additionally, the base plate positions can be finalised and drilled at this stage.

Strengthening Key Points: Base Plate Welding

The thick base plate for the front hoop requires special attention during welding. Here's the technique used by Mini Sport Ltd.:

  1. Focus the weld heat on the thicker base plate edge, allowing it to melt into the thinner floorpan steel below.
  2. Another plate is located below the B-pillar for added reinforcement.
Trial fitment of a bolt-in roll cage to ensure proper positioning before final installation in a Mini.

Mini Sport Ltd.'s Custom Touches: Enhanced Cage Support

Mini Sport Ltd. incorporates a few modifications to the standard Safety Devices cage:

  • Extended Rear Arch Foot: The cage foot connecting to the rear arch is extended for improved support.
  • Additional Boxed-In Plate: This plate provides additional support for the cage due to the "inboard" curvature of the rear arch.
Boxed-in plate welded to a Mini's roll cage for added support.

Protecting the Fresh Paint: Essential Precautions

Once the cage is painted, meticulous care is taken to avoid damaging the finish during installation. Here are some of the techniques used:

Cardboard and Masking Tape: These materials protect the floor, rear inside edges, and door edges from scratches.

Loosely fitted bolts during the installation of a roll cage in a Mini.

Ratchet Straps and Cloths: The rear hoop is carefully positioned using straps with cloths to prevent paint damage.

Two-Person Manoeuvre: Fitting the rear hoop is a delicate process best tackled by two people to avoid any rushed movements.

Ratchet strap used to tension a roll cage for secure installation in a Mini.
Second ratchet strap used for extra tension during roll cage installation.

The Final Steps: Securing the Cage and Maintaining Certification

  • Tightening the Straps and Bolts: The rear hoop is secured with ratchet straps before tightening the fastening bolts. A secondary strap is used for additional safety during bolt installation.
  • Bolt Placement and Passenger Safety: The direction of the securing bolts is carefully considered, ensuring they don't interfere with the tire on full bump or pose a risk to passengers' heads.
  • FIA/RACMSA Certification: This crucial element ensures the cage meets motorsport safety regulations.
Ratchet strap used to tension a roll cage for secure installation in a Mini.
FIA/RACMSA safety sticker on a roll cage installed in a Mini.
Installation of Mini Roll cage

While this guide provides an overview of installing a bolt-in roll cage, remember, safety is paramount in motorsport. For a guaranteed safe and effective roll cage installation specific to your Mini, consult a trusted Mini specialist like Mini Sport Ltd. Their expertise and experience will ensure your motorsport dreams become a reality, without compromising on safety.

Want to read Keeping Your Mini Alive 6th Edition Magazine? Download the PDF here

Front Cover of the Keeping Your Mini Alive Magazine

Don't miss out on the rest of the Bogus 2 Series!

This blog series is your one-stop shop for following Bogus 2's incredible journey from a bare shell to a road-worthy classic. Check out the rest of the series for tips and advice for every stage of your Mini restoration!

Stay Connected with Mini Sport:

Follow us on social media for the latest news, restoration tips, project updates, and to see more classic Minis brought back to life!

Equipping your classic Mini for motorsport requires prioritising both performance and safety. In this post, we delve into Mini Sport Ltd.'s process for installing a bolt-in roll cage on the Bogus 2 rebuild project. Balancing Safety and Convenience: Bolt-In vs. Weld-In Cages The Bogus 2 features a minimum-spec FIA/RACMSA Safety Devices 7-point bolt-in cage. This [...]
Painted Bogus 2 Shell, after stripping and repairs by Mini Sport

In Part 4 of our Bogus 2 rebuild, we delve into the paint, transforming the restored shell from raw metal to a gleaming masterpiece. Here at Mini Sport, we prioritise achieving a concours-quality finish, and paint plays a vital role in achieving that goal.

Prep Work is Key

The journey begins with meticulous preparation. After "flatting" the shell to remove any remaining paint and degreasing the surface, we apply an etch primer. This acidic primer bites into the metal, providing excellent adhesion for subsequent paint layers. A high-build filler primer follows, creating a smooth base for the final colour coats.

Flatted Mini shell primed for painting.

Challenges and Solutions

Painting a Mini's underside presents a unique challenge due to limited access. To ensure a flawless finish in these areas, we keep the shell on the rotisserie and spray at a 90-degree angle. This allows for better coverage and a truly professional result. Watch our Body Shop Manager Basil paint a Mk2 Cooper Shell for Bangers & Cash: Restoring Classics!

Mini shell interior and underside painted.

Safety First

Spraying paint, particularly two-pack or isocyanate paints, poses serious health risks. Inhalation can cause permanent lung damage. That's why we recommend entrusting paint jobs to professionals who have the proper safety equipment and controlled environments like a dedicated paint booth. Contact the team for more information on our Spray Centre!

Professional spray booth with worker in protective gear painting a Mini shell.

Beyond Aesthetics: Sealing for Longevity

Mini Sport goes a step further than simply using rubber grommets for unused holes. We prefer bonding small metal discs for a more durable and weatherproof seal. This approach also offers additional protection in case of an accident. Some motorsport regulations even mandate sealed compartments, and this method provides a reliable solution for the boot and other areas. For advice or recommendations on Mini Motorsport parts contact our Expert Sales Team!

Small metal disc welded to seal an unused hole in a Mini shell.

Masking Matters

Masking is a crucial step before applying different paint colours. Even tiny gaps can lead to paint bleeding. We take extra care by applying tape and meticulously sealing the edges, especially where colours meet. Remember, paint can travel far in a spray booth environment!

Masked Mini shell sections prepared for applying different paint colors.

Seam Edge Cover Secrets

For Minis painted with two-pack paint, there's a special technique for fitting seam edge covers. First, prime the car, then install the clips and spray them with primer again. Once dry, apply a coat of two-pack topcoat on the area before attaching the primed edge covers. This approach prevents rapid seam corrosion, a common issue with the Longbridge factory's method of fitting covers before painting.

Painted and fitted seam edge covers on a Mini.
Final coat of Rover Eclipse Blue paint applied to a Mini shell.

The Final Touches

With everything masked off, Bogus 2 receives its final coat of two-pack paint. We opted for a stunning Rover Eclipse Blue (code JNN or BLVC459) for the body and a classic BMC OE White (code WT3) for the roof. Using sufficient paint mixed in one go is essential. Aim for three coats following the paint manufacturer's instructions. It's always better to have more paint than needed. Leftovers can be used as a base coat, minimising the risk of colour variations due to different paint batches.

Top Tip about what type of paint should be used based off colour.

From Shell to Safety Cage: Painting Everything

Even non-body components like the bolt-in roll cage receive the paint treatment. After prepping and flatting the original paint, we follow the same process of etch priming, high-build priming, and painting, ensuring a cohesive look. Remember to mask off any crucial elements like certification stickers.

Mini roll cage prepped with primer, ready for paint.

A Look Inside the Painted Shell

A peek inside the painted wing reveals exceptional paint coverage and additional MIG welds added to the front panel inner seam for strength and water sealing. This area is particularly vulnerable to rust due to water spray from the front tire, so taking extra care is crucial.

Good coverage of paint achieved inside a Mini wing.

The Importance of Detail

The polishing process can reveal hidden imperfections, like the slight damage on the dash top rail. While we'll be covering this area with a dash cover for our instrument pod, it highlights the importance of a thorough inspection during restoration.

In the next part of the Bogus 2 saga, we'll delve into the subframes and running gear and the journey towards getting this classic Mini back on the road!

Dust from the polishing process visible on a Mini's top dash rail.

Want to read Keeping Your Mini Alive 6th Edition Magazine? Download the PDF here

Front Cover of the Keeping Your Mini Alive Magazine

Don't miss out on the rest of the Bogus 2 Series!

This blog series is your one-stop shop for following Bogus 2's incredible journey from a bare shell to a road-worthy classic. Check out the rest of the series for tips and advice for every stage of your Mini restoration!

No matter your vision, our team of passionate Mini specialists is here to turn it into reality. With our extensive knowledge and huge range of Mini parts and accessories, we can help you build the perfect Mini for your needs.

Contact us today and let's discuss how we can transform your Mini into a legend

Stay Connected with Mini Sport:

Follow us on social media for the latest news, restoration tips, project updates, and to see more classic Minis brought back to life!

In Part 4 of our Bogus 2 rebuild, we delve into the paint, transforming the restored shell from raw metal to a gleaming masterpiece. Here at Mini Sport, we prioritise achieving a concours-quality finish, and paint plays a vital role in achieving that goal. Prep Work is Key The journey begins with meticulous preparation. After [...]
shows the underside of a classic Mini coated with stonechip protection to prevent rust and damage from road debris.

Welcome back to the Bogus 2 build series, brought to you by Mini Sport Ltd.! Today, we're revisiting a crucial aspect of the restoration process – body repair.

While our previous blog posts delved into the details of the repairs, this one focuses on practical tips you can apply to your own classic Mini. We'll be drawing on insights gleaned from Bogus 2 and the expertise of our Mini restoration specialists.

Stonechip Protection: Don't Forget the Underside!

While Bogus 2 didn't receive stonechip protection for the entire underside, it's a valuable addition for many classic Minis. This protective coating shields vulnerable areas from the harsh elements they encounter on the road. At Mini Sport, we typically recommend stonechip paint for the sills, but a full underbody coating can be a great option for added peace of mind, especially for cars that see frequent use! Ready to shield your Mini from road debris? Contact us today to discuss stonechip protection options!

Sealing the Seams: Keeping Rust at Bay

Seams are a potential weak spot for rust development. As you can see with the Bogus 2 front wing and front panel, even seemingly small gaps can invite trouble. That's why proper seam sealing is essential. We recommend treating all seams, including the headlight ring, to create a barrier against moisture and corrosion.

Close-up view of a seam on a classic Mini's front wing, highlighting the area that requires sealing to prevent rust.

Seam Sealer Application

Applying seam sealer requires a delicate touch. The goal is to inject a bead deep into the seam using a continuous, steady motion (ideally after the panels have been dried thoroughly). Use your finger to push the sealant in, leaving a visible seam line. Don't overfill, as this can lead to paint cracking later.

After applying the sealant, remove excess residue with thinners (remember, this example uses bare metal, but ideally, sealing happens after priming). The key here is timing. The sealant should be tacky when the final paint layers are applied, allowing for proper adhesion. Completely dry sealant will lead to paint cracking.

A technician applying seam sealer to the joined panels of a classic Mini during the body repair process.
A technician using their finger to push seam sealant deeper into the joined panels of a classic Mini for a watertight seal.
Technician cleaning excess seam sealant residue from a classic Mini panel after application.

Joddling Panel Edges: An Alternative Joining Method

Joddling is an option for joining larger sheet panels. This technique creates a step in one edge, allowing the other panel to fit snugly in the seam. Joddler tools can also punch holes for plug welding, but keep in mind that these areas may require additional sealing and welding for a watertight finish. Mini Sport often favors other methods due to these additional steps.

A tool called a "joddler" being used to create a step in the edge of a classic Mini panel for a secure join during body repair.

Clamping Solutions for a Flawless Finish

Clamping the joined sheets is crucial to avoid distortion. Our example showcases handy Micro clamps, perfect for creating a flat and secure seam.

Remember, these are just a few key body repair tips, we always recommend contacting a reputable body repair expert! For a comprehensive restoration experience and access to top-quality parts, contact the experts at Mini Sport Ltd. We're here to help your classic Mini reach its full potential!

Close-up view of a joddling tool punching holes in a classic Mini panel for potential plug welding during body repair.
Mini body repair in progress, showing two clamped classic Mini panels to ensure a flat and secure seam.

Want to read Keeping Your Mini Alive 6th Edition Magazine? Download the PDF here

Front Cover of the Keeping Your Mini Alive Magazine

Need help? No matter the condition of your Mini's body, our team of passionate restoration specialists is here to breathe new life into it! From battling pesky rust to perfecting panel gaps, our extensive knowledge and vast selection of Body Panels ensure we have the tools and expertise to tackle any body repair challenge.

Contact us today and let's discuss how we can transform your Mini into a legend

Stay Connected with Mini Sport:

Follow us on social media for the latest news, restoration tips, project updates, and to see more classic Minis brought back to life!

Welcome back to the Bogus 2 build series, brought to you by Mini Sport Ltd.! Today, we're revisiting a crucial aspect of the restoration process – body repair. While our previous blog posts delved into the details of the repairs, this one focuses on practical tips you can apply to your own classic Mini. We'll [...]
Stripped Mini shell mounted on a rotisserie for rust repair.

With the shell stripped bare in Part 2, we are now ready to tackle the inevitable: rust and hidden repairs. Our team of experts is equipped with the knowledge and tools to bring your Mini back to its former glory.

The Rotisserie:

With the shell stripped clean, it gets secured on a rotating frame, also known as a spit or rotisserie. This ingenious tool is a game-changer for classic Mini repairs:

  • Maintaining Shape: The rotisserie helps the shell retain its original shape during repairs.
  • Easy Access: Effortlessly reach every part of the shell for repairs from a comfortable standing position.
  • Painting Efficiency: The rotisserie can even be moved into the spray booth, streamlining the painting process and ensuring optimal coverage.

This setup significantly reduces painting time while guaranteeing a flawless finish. However, depending on the frame used, later Mini shells might require a small cutout in the rear firewall, similar to the Mk1 or Mk2 shells.

Applying paint to a shell secured on a rotating stand after repairs.

Unearthing the Past: Common Mini Issue

The true extent of corrosion and previous repairs often becomes evident only after removing panels. Our donor Mini's scuttle panel, for instance, was in dire need of replacement due to severe creasing and patchwork repairs. This process also revealed a corroded shut-off plate at the top of the arch and a rust hole behind the front top damper mount.

Damaged scuttle panel of a Mini removed for repair, showing extensive body filler use.

Inner Wing issues & solutions

Heavily patched inner wings are a common issue with classic Minis. In such cases, replacing the entire panel can be more efficient than attempting extensive repairs. We used a specialized spot weld removal drill bit to save time and minimize distortion while removing the old welds.

For the new inner wings, spot welding was the preferred method whenever possible. Plug welds were used in areas where spot welding wasn't feasible. It's important to note that some pre-assembled inner wings with A-panels can cause fitting issues. New body panels from reputable suppliers like Heritage typically come with a black finish, which should not be mistaken for a reliable undercoat.

Patched inner wing of a Mini shell, highlighting a common repair area
Mini shell with a new inner wing panel welded on, showcasing the different repair techniques

Preparing for the New Floor

With the floor section cut out, the connecting edge of the bulkhead needs thorough cleaning and rust treatment before the new floor is welded in place. This critical step ensures a strong and rust-free connection between the new and existing panels. Furthermore, the shell must remain on the rotisserie during this process to prevent any warping.

Rusted floor section cut out of a Mini shell, exposing corrosion damage.

Door braces play a vital role in maintaining the shell's shape while the new floor is clamped in position. A crucial aspect is ensuring the rear subframe fits perfectly into the designated boot floor holes. The only modification needed on the British Motor Heritage floorpan in our case was elongating the holes for accessing the captive nuts in the heelboard, without compromising the integrity of the trunnion bolts.

Door braces used to maintain the shape of a Mini shell during repairs.

Spot On Welding

Mini Sport Ltd. prioritises replicating the original Longbridge factory methods by utilising spot welding for a strong and lasting bond between panels. The number of welds applied matches or even surpasses the original amount to comply with Thatcham vehicle repair regulations. For areas where spot welding isn't suitable, plug welds are implemented using a MIG welder.

Here's a breakdown of the plug welding process:

  1. Precise holes are drilled through the top panel.
  2. Joining surfaces are meticulously cleaned and coated with a zinc-rich weld-through primer.
  3. The panels are fused together using a MIG welder.
  4. The welded seams are then ground and smoothed out for a clean finish.
Plug welding process with a MIG welder being used for Mini bodywork repair.
Technician using a hammer to check alignment of Mini body panels during repair.

Precise Panel Replacement

A significant portion of the rear quarter panel required attention. Ensuring a perfect match between the new and existing panels with no gaps is paramount. To achieve this, the new panel is meticulously trimmed using a fine air saw to align flawlessly with the original contours. The panel is then tack-welded, ground, and allowed to cool completely before continuing.

Patience is key in this process!

To prevent distortion, avoid making continuous spot welds initially. Instead, use a staggered approach with short welds, allowing them to cool completely before adding new welds in the middle and then halving the gap again. Once the entire joint is tacked, a low-power seam weld finalises the bond.

Rear quarter panel of a Mini undergoing repair work.

Using cool damp cloths to cool down the metal is counterproductive as it introduces moisture, which can negatively impact the weld strength. Heat buildup is the primary concern when joining two panels. Welding everything in one go can lead to panel distortion. Joddling (also known as jogging) the panel is another possible method.

Metal Thickness

The appropriate weld amperage depends on the thickness of the metal being joined. Common Mini panels are typically made from 18- or 16-gauge steel, which translates to 1.27mm and 1.59mm thick respectively. After welding, the panel can be ground flat to create a smooth surface, as seen in the image.

Repaired Mini rear panel ground flat to create a smooth surface.

Weld Penetration and Sound Deadening Removal

The quality of your welds can be checked by examining their penetration on the inside of the joint. A proper weld should completely fuse the two panels together. This area also reveals the original sound deadening material.

Removing sound deadening can be a challenge. Cold material might chip off easily, while more stubborn areas may require a heat gun to loosen its grip. It's crucial to remove all sound deadening before welding to eliminate fire hazards. While time-consuming, this process also helps reduce weight, a benefit for this particular car.

Weld penetration inspection on the inside of a repaired Mini panel.

Scuttle Panel Replacement 

Spot welding secures most of the scuttle panel along the window opening. The A-pillar utilizes a seam weld similar to the rear quarter panel. Remember, the wiring loom typically runs inside this pillar, so remove it before welding.

VIN Legalities

The chassis number, or VIN, may be stamped on the scuttle panel. It's important to note that replacing this panel doesn't authorize you to stamp the new one with the old VIN. Only the DVLA has that authority. While some people might weld the old number back in, be aware that this practice is illegal.

Seam welding being applied to the A-pillar of a Mini during repairs.

Front Bulkhead Alignment Tips

The bonnet hinge brackets were intentionally left on the front bulkhead to serve as a reference point during scuttle panel replacement. If you're replacing this panel, use the bonnet to ensure proper alignment. Removing the entire bulkhead hinge bracket eliminates this reference point. Simply detach the hinge arms themselves.

When aligning the front bodywork with the doors and A-panels already fitted, especially on Mk4 and later models with rubber-mounted subframes, these subframes need solid mounting using specialized steel brackets that replace the original rubberized ones. The front panel is then bolted to it, again using the bonnet as a reference, before lining up the wings.

Front section of a Mini shell with the bulkhead visible, during the repair process.

Final Touches: Priming and Beyond

With the new boot floor securely welded in place, meticulously cleaning all connecting edges is essential in preparation for priming, seam sealing, and topcoats. Don't be fooled by the black paint on new steel panels – it's not a substitute for proper priming.

Thorough surface preparation is key to long-lasting repairs. This involves meticulously prepping all areas before priming, especially those hard-to-reach spots that might seem tedious now but will pay off in the future. Remember, attention to detail is crucial!

Newly welded boot floor in a Mini shell, ready for further repairs.
Thorough surface preparation of a Mini shell before applying primer for long-lasting repairs.

New Floor Panels and Maintaining Shell Shape

The images showcase the Heritage floor and boot panels used in this project. Given the extensive patching required, a complete replacement made perfect sense. However, it's crucial to take steps to maintain the shell's shape before removing old panels. This can involve using brace bars or even welding in temporary strengthening bars if necessary. Unfortunately, new floor panels are not currently available for earlier Minis like the Mk1 and Mk2.

British Motor Heritage full floor panel for a Mini, featuring the black factory coating.

We hope this blog post provided a comprehensive look at the body repairs involved in a classic Mini rebuild. Stay tuned for Part 3, where we'll delve into the exciting world of painting and final assembly!

Want to read Keeping Your Mini Alive 6th Edition Magazine? Download the PDF here

Front Cover of the Keeping Your Mini Alive Magazine

Mini Sport: Your One-Stop Mini Revival Workshop

We're your trusted resource for all things Mini, ready to turn back the clock or unleash the hidden beast within your beloved car:

    • Restoration: Dream of a complete overhaul? We offer a meticulous restoration & repairs service, meticulously bringing your classic Mini back to its former glory, from a nut-and-bolt rebuild to a refresh of the interior.

    • Performance Upgrades: Craving more power and sharper handling? We have a treasure trove of performance parts to unlock your Mini's potential, whether you're a weekend thrill-seeker or a serious track warrior.

    • Motorsport Preparation: Ready to take the checkered flag? Our team's knowledge and experience will transform your Mini into a competition-dominating force.

    • EV Conversion: Envisioning a greener future for your Mini? We can guide you through the exciting world of electric vehicle conversions, ensuring a sustainable and exhilarating driving experience.

    • Fully Bespoke Creations: Have a vision for your Mini that breaks the mold? Our team is here to collaborate with you on designing and building a one-of-a-kind masterpiece.

No matter your vision, our team of passionate Mini specialists is here to turn it into reality. With our extensive knowledge and huge range of Mini parts and accessories, we can help you build the perfect Mini for your needs.

Contact us today and let's discuss how we can transform your Mini into a legend

Stay Connected with Mini Sport:

Follow us on social media for the latest news, restoration tips, project updates, and to see more classic Minis brought back to life!

With the shell stripped bare in Part 2, we are now ready to tackle the inevitable: rust and hidden repairs. Our team of experts is equipped with the knowledge and tools to bring your Mini back to its former glory. The Rotisserie: With the shell stripped clean, it gets secured on a rotating frame, also [...]